Manchurian pear (Pyrus ussuriensis), also known as Harbin pear, Chinese pear, and Ussurian pear, is a flowering plant belonging to the family Rosaceae. It is native to Korea, Japan, and the Ussuri river area of far eastern Russia. This hardy, medium-sized deciduous tree is widely cultivated in Australia due to its adaptability, plenty of spring flowers, summer shiny and green foliage, and magnificent autumn colours. These features make it a favourite with landscape designers.

 

Pyrus ussuriensis Manchurian Pear
Pyrus ussuriensis Manchurian Pear has plenty of spring flowers, summer shiny and green foliage, and magnificent autumn colours.

Favorable growing conditions: The Manchurian pear tree is commonly cultivated in temperate and subtropical climates because it is tolerant of cold and heat. It requires full sunshine. Therefore put it in an area of the garden which is unshaded. It should receive a minimum of 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight per day for the maximum spring flowers and autumn colours. However, specific cultivars can also thrive in partial shade. Manchurian pears can thrive in nearly any soil, but well-drain clay or loamy soils are ideal for this tree. It prefers soils with a pH between 5.0 and 7.5 on average and does not sustain severely saline soils well.

Are Manchurian pear trees fast growing? How tall is a Manchurian pear?

The Manchurian pear tree is a fast-growing tree that can grow up to 10 m tall and spread up to 7 m with a rounded canopy. This tree is highly valued because of its leaves and flowers. Its leaves are oval and are glossy and dark green, which turn into different colours in autumn, such as plum-red, scarlet and gold. The Manchurian pear tends to lose its leaves around the end of autumn.

Manchurian Pear
A view of the banks of Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra with the Manchurian Pear trees in full bloom and the communication tower on Black Mountain in the distance. Manchurian Pear trees’ leaves are oval and are glossy and dark green, which turn into different colours in autumn, such as plum-red, scarlet and gold

This tree blooms very early in the spring. Its dark brown buds begin to open, showing a light pink tone before blossoming into a stunning display of white spring flowers. Small fruits appear after the flowers, which are not edible for humans.

Pyrus ussuriensis
Ornamental Pear Pyrus ussuriensis – Manchurian Pear with inedible fruit

Do Manchurian pear trees have invasive roots?

Manchurian pear tree roots are tough and aggressive. They can even be called invasive under some conditions, and people do not want these roots near houses or other structures. They should also not be planted too close to other trees since the roots can become entangled.

Caring for your Pyrus Ussuriensis

Manchurian pear is a drought-resistant tree and does not need additional watering unless suffering from a long period of drought with heat. However, the immature tree requires consistent watering until it becomes established. After the plant has been established, water it only when the topsoil is dry and slightly yellowish. Avoid excessive watering, which might cause problems. Each year, fertilisers should be given in early spring.

Manchurian pear
A view of the banks of Lake Burley Griffin, Canberra with the Manchurian Pear trees in full bloom, the communication tower on Black Mountain in the distance and Commonwealth Avenue Bridge. Image taken in early spring.

Pruning is essential if you want to maintain the balanced appearance of your Manchurian pear tree. Pruning is also necessary for a tree to remain healthy, handsome, and stable for many years. The optimal time to prune your Manchurian pear tree is at the end of autumn when the leaves have fallen. Cut off the damaged or dead branches since they will ultimately become brittle and lose. Also, eliminate the disease branches by pruning.

 

Manchurian Pear problems

Usually, theĀ  tree is not particularly susceptible to pest and disease problems. However, some insects and diseases can attack this tree. For example, aphids will attack newly emerging plants. Aside from that, petal blight could harm the flowers in a mainly wet spring. Petal blight can be treated by spraying fungicides before the disease develops. Aphids can be controlled by spraying the leaves of the Manchurian tree with a mild solution of water and a few drops of dish soap.

Manchurian tree in the landscape design

Pyrus ussuriensisĀ is a highly decorative and famous tree due to its hardiness and widespread adaptability to less-than-ideal site conditions. Due to its visual attractiveness and vitality, it has been utilised in various applications. This is a perfect tree for providing shade or as a feature tree in street plantings, parks or extensive gardens. They look spectacular when lined through narrow streets or avenues. This tree is also used in screens or borders, providing a sense of privacy in the summer when outdoor activities are high.

Manchurian pear (Pyrus ussuriensis),
Manchurian Pear Pyrus calleyerana

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