Archives for Commercial Landscaping

Melbourne Landscaper - Concrete pour into formwork Mill Park Leisure Centre

Melbourne Landscaper – Mill Park Leisure

Melbourne Landscaper Red’s Landscaping and Civil has begun landscaping work at the Mill Park Leisure Centre.

About the Mill Park Leisure Project

Building facilities

The redevelopment of the facilities is being completed by CICG pty ltd. The improvements to the facilities include group fitness rooms, weight training and cardio areas and 3 new swimming pools. The existing swimming pool will be improved to include an all abilities ramp and retiling.

Commercial landscaping of the Public Space.

The commercial landscaping part of the project includes outdoor exercise equipment, barbecues and play equipment.

 

 

Hardscaping

The commercial hardscaping part of the project included in-situ concrete stairs and retaining walls as well as outdoor exercise equipment with soft rubber sports surfaces.

 

Melbourne Landscaper. In-situ concrete curved stairs

In-situ concrete curved stairs.  Mill Park Leisure redevelopment

 

 

Melbourne Landscaper - Concrete in-situ steps Mill Park Leisure centre.

Melbourne Landscaper – Concrete in-situ steps Mill Park Leisure centre.

 

Melbourne Landscaper - Concrete pour into formwork Mill Park Leisure Centre

Melbourne Landscaper – Concrete pour into formwork Mill Park Leisure Centre

 

 

Concrete pour into formwork Mill Park Leisure Centre

Concrete pour into formwork Mill Park Leisure Centre

 

Softscaping

The commercial softscaping part of the project includes the planting of thousands of indigenous and Australian native trees.

 

Project Funding

The Mill Park Leisure Centre redevelopment has been jointly funded by local Government and the State Government of Victoria.  For the entire project funding of $25 million, the State Government of Victoria  has contributed $5 million towards the project. The Growing suburbs fund has contributed $2 million and a further $3 million has been contributed by the  Community Sport Infrastructure Fund.

 

More Melbourne Landscaper Blogs

 

Balwyn Landscaping – Commercial Project

 

Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil – Quality landscaping Melbourne

 

 

About the Growing suburbs fund

https://www.localgovernment.vic.gov.au/grants/growing-suburbs-fund

 

About the Community Sport Infrastructure Fund.

https://sport.vic.gov.au/grants-and-funding/our-grants/community-sports-infrastructure-stimulus-program

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Tennis court repair Balwyn

Balwyn Landscaping – Commercial Project

Balwyn is an inner eastern suburb of Melbourne and lies in the northern part of the city of Boroondara. It was in this area that grazier John Gardiner settled near the point where Gardiners creek meets the Yarra River. The commercial editor of the Argus, Andrew Murray built house named Balwyn which gives the area its name.

 

How far is Balwyn from the Melbourne CBD?

Balwyn is only 10 kilometres from the Melbourne CBD and in an easterly direction. It was once serviced by the outer loop railway station at Deepdene.

 

Balwyn Community Centre

The Balwyn Community Centre at 412 Whitehorse Road Surrey Hills was upgraded to ensure it would continue to support the needs of the local Balwyn Community. As well as the upgrades to the buildings, there were landscaping works for the parkland, natural wetlands,  exposed aggregate concrete pathways and tennis courts.

Balwyn Community Centre Scope of works.

 

The hard landscaping for the Community Centre

The scope of work for this project included the following hard landscaping construction;

  • Plain, coloured and exposed aggregate concrete,
  • In-situ or poured in place concrete garden retaining walls,
  • Exposed aggregate concrete driveway crossovers,
  • Concrete upstands, edges, ramps stairs and landings.

 

The soft landscaping for Balwyn Community Centre

The scope of work for this project included the following soft landscaping installation;

 

  • The planting of advanced indigenous trees
  • The application of appropriate fertilizers
  • Lawn areas
  • The planting of native grasses and ornamental plants
  • Aggregate and Gravel
  • Imported top soil to Australian Standards
  • A sophisticated Irrigation System
  • Areas of mass planting
  • Mulched garden beds
  • Planting of Australian Native Shrubs
  • Garden edging.

Existing trees at the Community Centre

The existing tress on the site included the following;

  • Pin Oak (Quercus palustris),
  • River Red Gum (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) ,
  • Narrow leaved black Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii),
  • Lemon scented gum (Corymbia citriodora),
  • Prickly leaved Paperbark ( Melaleuca styphelioides)
  • Forest Oak (Allocasuarina torulosa),
  • Drooping She-oak (Allocasuarina verticilata)
  • Smooth Barked Apple ( Angophora Costata)

Nearly all of these existing trees were kept in the new landscape design.

 

Native Wetlands

Later in the project rehabilitation of native wetlands was added including a child proof fence.

 

Tennis Court Repairs and reconstruction

Part of the landscaping included repairs to a tennis court and the construction of another tennis court. A good sport surface must be stable, therefore the new tennis court was constructed with asphalt over 300 mm of roadbase.

Synthetic clay Tennis Court surface

A low maintenance synthetic clay tennis court surface was required to laid over the asphalt. Therefore, the surface chosen was Grassports Policlay. In addition to being low maintenance, Grassports Policlay is a fast draining low maintenance water free tennis surface resulting in the ideal surface for public tennis courts. A high quality sporting surface was required, therefore the asphalt surface was flattened rigorously in preparation. The very thick roadbase foundation will also help to maintain the stability of the playing surface. Root barriers we also installed to prevent invasive tree roots causing any unevenness to the playing surface.

 

Soft play surfaces

The soft play coloured surfaces in the landscape was required, so an EPDM rubber was chosen. In addition to its great colour range, EPDM is a synthetic rubber widely used in the automotive industry. Similarly, its mechanical properties make it ideal for this application. For instance, it has great UV stability, abrasion resistance, ozone resistance and it is water proof. So, the material used was Playkote which was installed as a rubber wet pour over SBR underlay. In addition to the added height, the SBR underlay makes the play surface a little softer.

 

Outdoor Exercise  Equipment

"Exercise

 

Environmentally Friendly Garden Furniture

Garden furniture including picnic tables, benches and seats were installed to add to the public amenity. In addition to the the amenity and aesthetic provided, recycled materials were also used. To this end, the material used was Enviroslat.  Enviroslat is an environmentally friendly low maintenance material produced from HDPE waste mixed with recycled cellulose. The recycled cellulose hardwood waste and rice husks.

Outdoor Furniture on Exposed aggregate concrete.

Outdoor Furniture on Exposed aggregate concrete. ACLA Consultants landscape architects.

 

Table Tennis Table

Table Tennis Table with bespoke surface treatment.

Table Tennis Table with bespoke surface treatment.

 

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The finished Commercial landscaping Project

 

About the Community Centre  Commercial Landscaping Project

Landscape Architects: ACLA Consultants landscape architects.

 

Building Construction: CICG

 

Customer: City of Boroondara

 

Hume Global Learning Centre – Sunbury

 

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil – Quality landscaping Melbourne

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Aerial Photograph - Commercial Landscaping Melbourne

Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

Commercial landscaping involves much more than planting trees and grasses. In the commercial world, keeping to the required timing plan is essential. This is especially the case when working with large commercial construction companies with strict deadlines and millions of dollars of materials on the commercial sites.

What is commercial landscaping?

Commercial landscaping is landscape construction primarily for commercial properties and public spaces. In some cases it may also involve landscape design or it may require working  with a landscape architect instead.

Architectural concrete construction

Reds Landscaping using a boom pump to pour architectural concrete walls

What skills does a commercial landscaper need in this field?

These landscapers needs to be skilled at reading and interpreting building plans, project management, people management and material estimation. In addition to this the  landscaper needs to have a thorough understanding of horticulture, concrete construction and the principles of landscape design. It is also important to have spatial skills and artistic flair in order to convert what is seen on a 2D drawing into a real commercial landscape.

Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

 

To achieve the required aims in this landscaping field detailed planning is essential. This involves working with subcontractors such as form workers, concreters and horticulturist to the ensure everyone knows and meets the work schedule. Working in commercial landscaping also requires an eye for detail. When working with the local councils or other local authorities, the drawings are provided by the landscape architect. There is a great deal of skill for the commercial landscaper to interpret the drawings and ensure an accurate high-quality interpretation of the landscape architect is brought into fruition.

Client and sub-contractor negotiation Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

Client and sub-contractor negotiation. Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

What are the properties commercial landscapers develop?

These landscapers work on landscaping projects as diverse as office buildings, hotels, apartment buildings, factories, and public spaces around community infrastructure. Professional landscaping is also used around freeways and railway lines.

 

Horticulture Knowledge - Commercial Landscaper Melbourne

Horticulture Knowledge is essential in landscaping.

 

 

What else is important in this type of landscaping?

Landscapers need to be aware of their responsibilities to protect the environment and maintain a safe workplace as well as a safe facility for clients and members of the public. The quality of materials brought onto the work site as well as disposal of material from the site is important. These landscapers need to be true allrounders. As well as the horticulture, project management and commercial skills, the landscaper will need to have excellent knowledge of drainage and heavy duty irrigation systems.

What is a public space?

Public spaces are often parks, and also includes streetscapes, public squares and shopping centres regardless of who owns the property. An urban or rural outdoor place designed to produce benefit for the public.

What Landscaping Materials are used?

In this field the materials used can be quite different to residential landscaping. Public space landscaping often uses soft rubber surfacing, in-situ concreting and alternating coloured exposed aggregate concrete.

 

 

Where can I study to become a landscaper?

In Melbourne landscaping can be studied at Holmesglen. A Melbourne suburb near Glen Waverley.

The Certificate 3 course in Landscape Construction provides skills in areas including building with concrete, with brick, and with block or stone. Important landscaping skills include constructing paving, installing drainage systems, and building different types of retaining walls. Students also learn about plant health and topsoil structure.

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil – Melbourne Landscaper.

 

 

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Stunning Pink flowering gum.

Tree Landscape Design Melbourne

Tree landscape design is an essential part of commercial or residential landscape gardening. As the Chinese proverb goes, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now”. With the cooler months, it is time to think about planting some trees.

Trees as an attractive focal point

Some attractive Trees and shrubs can provide an interesting focal point for your garden. Many Australian native trees will provide vibrant coloured flower creating both beauty and food and habitat for a wide range of Australian fauna. As an added bonus, the colourful flowers provide a source of nectar and pollen for honeybees and native bees, well away from the garden pesticides. Foliage colours can also be used to create a contrast.

 

Lemon-scented myrtle also known as the Sweet Verbena Tree (Backhousia citriodora) is a Queensland species that is both attractive to honeybees and a source of bush tucker. However, as it is a rainforest plant, it is not particularly drought tolerant. If you look after it, you will be rewarded with clusters of attractive white flowers.

Design Considerations. – Locating the tree

When designing the garden for trees, make sure you consider the final height of the tree and any garden maintenance requirements. Space between the tree and a fence might need to be big enough for mower access. Also the location of any overhead power lines should be considered. If you are planting a street tree, the local council will have guidelines for the minimum distance to services such as stormwater outlets and power poles.

Planting Trees like a professional commercial landscaper

If your new tree comes in a plastic pot, make sure you protect it from the searing  sun. A few hours of intense sunlight on a black plastic pot can do a great deal of harm to your new tree. Make sure you give the root ball a good soaking. If possible, dip the pot into a bucket of water.

Tree Planting

Tree Planting. Make the hole much bigger than the pot especially in Melbourne clay soils.

Dig your hole much bigger than the pot size of the tree. That means if you are planting a tree from a 300 mm pot, the hole should be dug around 900 mm. This is especially the case if you are planting in poor quality soils. Aim to have the new tree slightly higher than the natural ground level. If you are in a heavy clay soil, dig in some organic matter both below and around the plant. If you use a lot of organic matter, this will tend to shrink as it decomposes so take care not to overdo it. The organic material used should be well composted. Backfill with 50% high quality topsoil mixed with the site topsoil. If you have a reactive clay soil, which is common in Melbourne, a hand full od gypsum can be dug into the bottom of the hole.

 

 

Once you have placed your tree in the hole, give the roots a bit of a tickle if they appear to have been root bound by the planter pot. This will encourage the roots to grow outward into the new soil. If you are planting a Eucalyptus or Magnolia, the roots should be disturbed as little as possible.

Water the new tree and tamp down on the soil to remove any air pockets. Cover the root zone with around 75mm thick mulch ensuring there is a gap between the trunk and the mulch to prevent collar rot. In most cases staking of the tree is not necessary. If you have a larger or a top heavy tree, use 2 or 3 stakes placed away from the trunk and tied loosely with a rag.

 

Correct tree staking.

Stakes need to be clear of the rootball. Ideally 50 mm hessian ties should be used and stapled to the stakes to allow some trunk movement. Ensure the ties do not damage the trunk.

 

 

Watering trees

To avoid drought stress with you newly planted trees, give the soil around the plant a good soaking. The best solution for saving water is a dripper irrigation system with a timer and a moisture sensor. An annual application of a soil wetting solution will save water by reducing run off.

Mulching around a tree

Create a dish to keep the mulch clear of the tree and the top of the root ball close to flush with the finished height. The mulch height should be 200mm with a diameter of 1200mm.

 

Weeding and mulching

Keep Weeds, lawns and other vegetation away from the root zone of your new tree until it is well established. For trees, this means an area of around 1.5 metres  diameter should be kept clear for the first 3 years. The mulch should be topped up annually as it slowly decomposes into the soil.

 

Feeding your new Tree

Native Trees

Native plants generally require very little fertiliser, so be careful when applying and always use low phosphorus fertilisers. Products like Neutrog Seamungus combine the trace elements of seaweed with the nitrogen of chook manure to get your plants off to a good start. Neutrog “Bush Tucker” has been developed specifically for Australian Native plants and is ideal for even the most phosphorus sensitive proteas, banksias or grevillias. As well as harming native trees, excess phosphorus will inhibit mycorrhizal fungi essential for root development with your new tree. Phosphorus run off into streams and waterways can also be a problem.

Exotic trees

Exotic trees will require a little bit more feeding for the low phosphorus Melbourne soils. Also add a small amount of slow release fertiliser to the hole.

 

 

Pruning

Even if your tree is an Australian Native, don’t be afraid of giving it a regular prune or trim to get it into the shape you want. This should be done both early and regularly. After a year or two it the tree should be strong enough to stay upright without the stakes. This is the reason why the young trees should not be staked too tightly. Always use a clean and sharp pruning saw to avoid spreading plant diseases.

 

Plant Selection

The trees selected for your Melbourne garden should be reasonably drought tolerant, non invasive and easy to maintain. Consideration should be given to the full extent  of the leaf canopy and the root zone when the plant is fully grown. In particular, the plants chosen need to have resistance to the weather conditions and the fungal diseases that go along with it. A visit to your local botanical gardens is a good way to select plants for your home garden and also pick up some landscaping ideas. Some councils Council have also published a guides to saving water. Some of the trees listed in the guide include Kurrajong, (Brachychiton populneus), Crape Myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica), Screw Pine (Pandanus Tectorius), Coastal Banksia (Banksia integrifolia), Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis anacardioides) , Tulipwood (Harpullia pendula), Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora) Blue Lilly Pilly (Syzygium oleosum)

 

Lagerstroemia indica has purple, pink or white crinkly flowers that appear like crape (or crepe). It is a deciduous tree but it can be grown as a  large shrub. The long dark leaves are bronze when the tree is growing rapidly.

 

Lagerstroemia Indica

Lagerstroemia Indica is a tree or shrub native to China and Korea. Striking conical panicles around 200mm long. Ideal for small gardens and Mediterranean gardens.

 

 

Blue Lilly Pilly (Syzygium oleosum) has stunning purple or blue berries contrasting with the rich dark green foliage. The colourful berries can be eaten.

 

Corymbia ficifolia or red flowering gum is native to southern Western Australia.

 

Many of us love the look and the bird attracting ability of the Western Australian Flowering Gum. (Corymbia ficifolia) (Previously know as Eucalyptus ficifolia). In the past the problem has been its ability to withstand the humidity of the Gold Coast. The good news is that horticulturalist Stan Henry has developed a hybrid variety suitable for the humid conditions of South East Queensland. The hybrids, which combine Corymbia ficifolia, the red flowering gum from south-west Western Australia with the swamp bloodwood, Corymbia ptychocarpa from northern Australia are know as the Summer series – ‘Summer Red’, ‘Summer Beauty’ and ‘Summer Snow’. Look for these in your local plant nursery.

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil Melbourne Landscaper.

 

Local Council Street Tree Policies

Stonnington (Covers Prahan, Toorak, Malvern and Glen Iris.)

 

 

 

http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life/summer-bursts-with-colour-as-cultivated-flowering-gums-thrive-in-new-frontiers-20151216-glp63z.html

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Hanson Bokhara Exposed aggregate concrete.

Exposed aggregate concrete pathways

Exposed aggregate concrete is a great design solution for public spaces. The attractive durable not slip surface makes it an ideal choice for landscape architects. High traffic areas around public buildings often use this type of concrete path.

Exposed Aggregate Colours

The aggregates are available in a wide range of colours to suit your landscape design.  The available colours include red, brown, dark grey basalt, green quarts as well as black and white. In combination with this selection, the fine grain aggregates or sands are also available in a wide range of selections. The colour of these these fine aggregate will also be the more dominant when the surface is lightly abraded. However, more heavily abraded surfaces will result in more of the colour of the course aggregates showing.  This will result in a different appearance for the exposed aggregate concrete path. Coupled with this, the cement matrix can also have colour added. Always take these factors into account when selecting the aggregates and especially during the process of exposing the aggregates.

Exposing the aggregate

In addition to this, exposing the aggregate at a different concrete curing time can lead to different appearance. Similarly, this can result in colour differences for the same site for the same aggregate concrete pathway. To maintain quality, the landscaper must use a consistent approach to exposing the aggregates. As a rule of thumb, no more than 1/3 of the aggregate should be exposed.

 

The suitability of Exposed Aggregate Pathways

The landscape architect needs to also consider the use of the exposed aggregate concrete path when selecting the aggregate. Use a fine rounded aggregate for areas near swimming pools. For exposed aggregate concrete paths where water drainage is important, 19mm aggregates should be used.  Exposed aggregates of more than 20mm can be very difficult to transport using a concrete pump.

Exposed aggregate concrete strength

When rounded pebbles are used throughout the path, the path will be slightly less strong. This is because the matrix will not bond to the aggregate as tightly as it will with rough shaped aggregates.  Generally, the path should be at least 100mm thick N25 concrete. N25 means that the concrete will achieve a compressive strength of 25 mPa after 28 days.

Preventing Cracks

Even the strongest concrete will be weak in tension or bending and even properly cured concrete will have microcracks. Therefore, to minimise cracking steel reinforcement must be used. For pathways, this should be at least SL 72 using saddles to keep it in the top 1/3 of the concrete.  SL72 means that the bars are each 7mm in diameter with grids of 200mm. The path should be laid on 100mm thick class 3 roadbase , if it is for public spaces. If there is any possibility of a vehicle driving on the path, then the path needs to be built like an exposed aggregate concrete driveway. This will be the case with any vehicle crossovers in the path design. In these cases the concrete needs to be at lease 125mm thick N32 (32mPa) concrete with SL92 mesh laid on at least 100mm of class 2 roadbase.

Landscape design with exposed aggregate concrete

Outdoor Furniture on Exposed aggregate concrete.

Durable Outdoor Garden Furniture on Exposed aggregate concrete. ACLA Consultants landscape architects.

Using alternating concrete colour to break up large areas of concrete.

When the customer requirements call for a large expanse of exposed concrete, alternating contrasting colours can help to break up the appearance.  The public space at Balwyn Community Centre, Melbourne, used alternating exposed aggregate concrete of Hanson Bokhara with Hanson Galaxy. The artificial turf also helps to break the appearance of the large area of concrete and gives the area a more tranquil appearance. (ACLA Consultants landscape architects.)

Contrasting Exposed aggregate concrete

Creating some shade with a tree in the concreted area. The tree roots are protected with a slotted stainless steel grate. The lighter colour Hansen Galaxy forms a geometric pattern around the grate.(ACLA Consultants landscape architects.)

 

Drinking Fountain and exposed aggregate concrete.

Drinking Fountain and exposed aggregate concrete. Hanson Bokhara contrasts well with the natural concrete in-situ walls. (ACLA Consultants landscape architects.)

 

Hanson Bokhara Exposed aggregate concrete.

Exposed aggregate concrete is ideal for garden steps and stairs to help maintain grip. Recent sealing of the concrete makes it appear slightly darker. (ACLA Consultants landscape architects.)

 

Alternating exposed aggregate

Alternating exposed aggregate path.  Garden beds also break up the space. Sunbury Global Learning Centre.

 

Alternating decorative finish path

Alternating coloured path with centre native garden. Sunbury Global Learning Centre.

 

Entrance and Alternating decorative finish concrete path

Building entrance and Alternating exposed coloured path. Sunbury Global Learning Centre.

 

Concrete block garden retaining wall with coping next to the decorative finish concrete path.

Concrete block garden retaining wall with coping next to the alternating exposed coloured path. Sunbury Global Learning Centre. Hanson Bruthen and Hanson Galaxy.

 

Alternating colours of the concrete decorative finish entrance way.

The decorative finish of the alternating decorative finish of the entranceway looks striking when compared to the old concrete footpath in the foreground. Sunbury Global Learning Centre.

Frequently asked questions about Exposed Aggregate Concrete

Is Exposed aggregate concrete expensive?

Exposed aggregate will be more expensive than normal concrete solutions. It will  however, add more value and landscaping interest to your property. There is also extra labour in exposing the aggregate. Alternating colours is  also great way to break up the large expanses of concrete. It will similarly add to the cost, but will add great value to your property.

Should you seal Exposed Aggregate Concrete?

Sealing is essential for these paths. The high quality sealer we use helps to maintain the appearance of the coloured concrete by preventing stains getting into the pores of the concrete. The sealer also helps to prevent dust coming off the concrete.

Is Exposed Aggregate Concrete Durable?

It is important not to exposed too much of the aggregate during the water pressure cleaning part of the process. This is because exposing the aggregate excessively will result in it breaking loose from the matrix. Do not expose them more than 30%. The concrete we use for pathways is N25 with SL72 reinforcement over a thick layer of roadbase.

Residential Concreting Solutions

For residential concreting solutions a smaller version of the commercial landscaping concepts can be applied. In some cases it will be necessary to cart the aggregate mix in by wheelbarrow.

Exposed Aggregate Concrete Melbourne

Concrete Designs, textures and colours

Outwest Concrete have a great range of  aggregate colours available.

Colours and Textures available.

 

 

 

More information on decorative concretes

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil quality commercial landscaping Melbourne

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In-situ concrete retaining wall and garden steps.

In-situ Concrete

In-situ Concrete, also known as insitu concrete, is an outstanding landscaping construction technique. In terms of long terms long term quality, robustness and longevity very few landscape construction techniques come close. To many people in-situ concrete is better know as landscaping architectural concrete and it is the point where landscaping, architecture and civil engineering all meet in landscape design. For the landscape design of public spaces, architectural concrete or in-situ concrete is a great choice for the severe use of our landscaped parks, gardens or commercial buildings. Some other names for in-situ concrete include “poured in place” concrete or “cast in place”  concrete”.

What is in-situ concrete?

In-Situ Concrete cast in place.

In-situ is concrete that as poured into formwork at the building site. When compared to pre-cast concrete, in-situ requires no crane or forklift to get it into position. In comparison with concrete block and rendered retaining walls, the very low porosity of sealed and vibed in-situ walls will ensure a quality finish for decades of use. With concrete block retaining walls, the blocks themselves will have some porosity which will allow moisture to creep under the rendered surface and may cause it to lift in a few years. In-situ concrete has the colour mixed in and the texture is provided by the formwork but it can be rendered if required.

In-situ Concrete pumped into the formwork.

In-situ Concrete pumped into the formwork through a boom.

In-Situ Concrete – strong connection to footings.

An additional advantage with in-situ  is it has a very strong and stable attachment to the very solid footings underneath. This is due to the reinforcement bars coming up from the footings and overlapping with the in-situ concrete steel reinforcement.  When compared with concrete block retaining walls, although the steel reinforcement runs up through the centre of the blocks, any voids in the concrete around the reinforcement can lead to corrosion of the reinforcement bars and concrete cancer. The homogeneity of the of the vibed in-situ walls also ensures a good attachment to the steel reinforcing bars and does not suffer the risk of a poor attachment of the core concrete to the inner void of the concrete blocks. Pre-cast concrete will usually require mechanical fixings to the footing. These fixings can corrode over time or can be ground off by vandals. Being securely attached to the footings is a big advantage of in-situ concrete. Newly constructed public spaces such as parks and gardens will often rely on these quality advantages of in-situ concrete.

Retaining wall footings.

Retaining wall footings with steel reinforcement protruding to give the retaining wall a strong connection to the footing. The reinforcement bars must be accurately placed.

Precast concrete versus in-situ in landscaping concrete architecture.

One of the advantages of precast concrete is that it is manufactured under controlled conditions in a factory. This ensures a consistent quality product. There can be a risk however of coloured concrete coming from different batches resulting in slightly different colours close together. The quality advantages of precast concrete can be matched by in-situ concrete with close attention to the details and quality control of the processes.

 

Quality in-situ concrete retaining walls, stairs and seating.

Commercial Retaining Walls Melbourne

Good quality in-situ concreting requires a lot of attention to the materials and the processes. In-situ concrete wall also need to consider the safety as well as the aesthetics of a public space or residential landscape construction project. A well constructed, quality, curved in-situ concrete wall will achieve both of these aims.

Stripping the formwork off the walls.

Stripping the formwork off the walls. Extra effort and attention to detail will result in a quality finish on the retaining walls.

Quality In-situ concreting footings.

Concrete sets by a chemical reaction and not by drying. The chemical reaction is ecothermic and water is part of the reaction. If there is a difference in temperature within the concrete or if the water evaporates quickly from the top surface, then cracking can be the result. Concrete footings should not be poured in freezing conditions or below 5 degrees. Fortunately, in Melbourne there are very few days when it is too cold to pour. In hot weather the concrete should not be poured during the hottest part of the day or in extremely hot weather. The top part of the footing can be kept moist with hessian or a light sprinkling of water to prevent the top layer of the footing being weaker.

Concrete reinforcement bars in the footings.

It is essential that the vertical bars coming out of the footing are located accurately. When the in-situ walls are poured, these bars need to be closed to the centre of the retaining wall with good overlap with the wall reinforcement. The concrete reinforcement within the footing should be encased within the concrete as much as possible to minimise the paths for moisture to get into the reinforcement.

 

Concrete footing design

If designing for in-situ concrete retaining walls, the concrete footing should be a suitable size for the wall, keeping in mind all of the loads on the wall including hydrostatic and mass of the wall. The design of the footings must be to Australian Standards.

 

Formwork for in-situ concrete retaining walls.

Quality in-situ walls require formwork that is smooth strong and flexible.  Any defect, imperfection of inaccuracy in the formwork will show up in the surface of the wall. The formwork needs to be strong enough to resist the weight of the wet concrete without bulging or deforming. Deflections in timer formwork will show up as ripples in the finished wall. A bulge in the formwork due to the hydrostatic load of the concrete will be a disaster when removing the formwork from the wall. The wall should be designed with a slight draft angle to make the removal easy without causing any damage to the retaining wall.

Strong supports for the formwork.

Strong supports for the formwork keep the wall dimensionally correct.

 

Accurately positioned formwork under construction.

Accurately positioned formwork under construction.

 

Pouring the concrete retaining walls.

Pouring the concrete retaining walls. Using the concrete vibrator to get a quality finish and good adhesion to the reinforcement.

 

 

Stripping the formwork after the concrete pour.

Stripping the formwork after the concrete pour. The formwork should be left on as long as possible to prevent the concrete drying excessively during curing. Taking the formwork off too early can result in microcracks in the concrete.

 

Stripping the formwork after the concrete pour

Stripping the formwork after the concrete pour and curing to show a quality result.

 

In-situ concrete steel reinforcement

The steel reinforcement bars must have a good overlap with the footing reinforcement bars and well encased within the concrete wall. Reinforcement to close to the surface may result in water ingress and concrete cancer.

 

Pouring the in-situ concrete.

The concrete walls should be poured in one go and definitely from the same batch of concrete.  Any interruption of the pour may show up as a line in the finished wall.  The freshly poured concrete should be thoroughly vibed to ensure there are no voids within the concrete especially on the outer surfaces or at the interface with the reinforcement.

The steel reinforcement within tin-situ also helps to prevent surface cracking. To minimise the surface cracks, we leave the formwork in place a little longer to keep the moisture in during curing. The concrete should then be given a light sprinkle of water once the formwork is removed as it is still curing. The concrete will not be fully cured for a few weeks so consider this before applying any excessive loads.

Landscape and Concrete Design

Landscape Design with in-situ walls.

In-situ walls give the landscape designer or the landscape architect enormous freedom to design shapes for retaining walls, seating  or concrete stairs that would be very difficult, if not impossible, using precast of other landscape construction techniques. In-situ walls can be designed into three dimensional shapes that would be impossible or expensive to do as Pre-cast. Curved retaining walls on an uneven landscape would be very difficult to achieve with any other landscape construction technique. Another advantage is the wide range of colours available.

In-situ concrete curved seating

In-situ concrete curved seating. Shapes like this are difficult with other landscape construction techniques.

 

Concrete stairs Cast in Place

Concrete stairs Cast in Place. This process is ideal for intricate or bespoke designs.

 

 

In-situ curved garden retaining wall.

Exposed aggregate path and in-situ curved garden retaining wall. Overflowing Australian native grasses in the garden bed soften the look of the concrete. The exposed aggregate path provides an attractive contrast to the wall and plants. It is also a safe non-slip cost-effective solution.

 

In-situ retaining wall and steps

In-situ retaining wall and steps

 

Curved In-Situ retaining wall.

Curved In-Situ retaining wall prior to the final touch up and surface treatment. The joins in the formwork will be visible until the concrete is ground back to an even join.

As the concrete is pumped in, damage to other landscaping structures can be avoided, making it  easier for the landscape project planner to  schedule the construction. These are important factors to consider when landscaping Melbourne public spaces.

In-Situ retaining wall.

A very straight In-Situ retaining wall.

 

In-situ retaining wall

Exposed aggregate pathway and in-situ retaining wall prior to filling and grinding by the concrete finisher. There will always be a few small voids to fill, but theses can be minimised with the vibe during the pour.

 

See also Concrete Architecture in Landscaping

 

Concrete For Landscape Design & Construction

 

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Environment - Clean Water

Environmental Policy for Commercial Landscaping

Environmental Policy aims

The aim of the Red’s Landscaping and Civil Environmental’s and Sustainability Policy is to provide effective environmental management that emphasises:

  1. a planned and proactive approach
  2. commitment and involvement of managers and officers at all levels
  3. meaningful and effective involvement of employees and other workers
  4. identification and control of potential sources of waste and pollution
  5. the development of a workplace culture that recognises the importance of environmental management and sustainability.
  6. appropriate provision of instruction, training, information and supervision

 

Environmental Protection Policy Responsibilities

 

The importance of environmental management requires that employees, sub-contractors and visitors take steps to safeguard the environment. Not only because of the potential legal implications, but also because it is the duty of companies to exceed the requirements of environmental legislation.

Employers and self-employed persons should be proactive and take all reasonable measures, to ensure a high standard of environmental protection;

Employers and employees should exchange information and ideas about risks to the environment and measures that can be taken to eliminate or reduce those risks;

Employees encouraged to submit ideas regarding waste minimisation, continuous improvement, health and safety and environmental protection. These are agenda items for the tool box meetings.

Environmental and Sustainability Policy Mission Statement

Environmental Policy

Red’s Landscape Gardening will comply with, and exceed, all local, state and federal laws and regulations on:

  • disposing of hazardous waste (including EPA’s list of prescribed industrial waste), trade waste (i.e. waste added to the sewer) and waste water.
  • safe handling, storage and transport of hazardous waste and dangerous goods
  • noise
  • land use
  • air pollution and carbon emissions

 

Procedure

Red’s Landscape Gardening will set targets each year to increase energy and water efficiency and seek opportunities for reducing and recycling waste. To do this, we will:

General

  • investigate ways to reduce consumption or recycle waste. E.g formwork recycling.
  • give preference to maintenance and other contractors using green products

Energy

  • buy electrical and lighting systems rated as energy efficient
  • use accredited GreenPower, either in part or whole

Water

  • buy appliances rated as water efficient
  • install irrigation systems that are designed to save water and minimise losses due to evaporation.
  • Select drought tolerant plant indigenous to the area where possible.

Waste

  • look for opportunities to improve waste management. Sustainability Victoria has tips on good waste management. Regular site inspections to identify potential safety and environmental hazards as well as potential waste reduction opportunities.
eco friendly recycling

Eco friendly recycling must be used were practical.

 

 

 

 

Environmental Policy –Soft Landscaping

  • We are committed to conservation and protection of trees, especially large canopy trees that take many years to mature.
  • effective mulching to reduce losses due to evaporation.
  • Use natural fertilisers where possible.
  • Identify and report any noxious or problem weeds.
  • The application of garden chemical shall supervised by suitably qualified and experienced personal. The supervisor must hold a recognised chemical handling license. All chemicals must be clearly labelled and food containers must not be used for chemicals.
  • Chemicals must be stored under lock and key with appropriate measures for spillage or leakage. An MSDS must be on site with any chemicals.
  • Materials brought into the worksite must be certified to the appropriate Standard.

 

 

 

Environmental PolicyConstruction and Demolition Waste

 

Building and construction sites create pollution, including different types of waste, noise and dust. Measures must be taken to minimise the impact of our work on the health of people and the environment.

Environmental Protection. Legal demolition waste disposal

Responsible Waste removal. Waste receipt dockets from an approved waste disposal facility are the only guarantee that waste from the site is going to the right place.

EnvironmentalWaste generators

As a waste generator, Red’s Landscaping and Civil is responsible for ensuring waste is taken to a facility that can lawfully accept it. Waste receipt dockets from an approved waste disposal facility are the only guarantee that waste from the site is going to the right place.

Construction and demolition (C&D) activities generate a wide range of industrial waste materials including:

  • excavated material such as rock and soil
  • waste asphalt, bricks, concrete, plasterboard, timber and vegetation
  • asbestos and contaminated soil.

If not managed responsibly, these waste streams can pollute the environment, pose a public health risk (particularly asbestos and contaminated soil) and pose amenity issues.

How to dispose of Construction and Demolition waste

“Under section 27A(2) of the Environment Protection Act 1970 (EP Act), any person (including a waste generator, transporter or receiver) who dumps or permits the inappropriate disposal of industrial waste at a place that cannot lawfully accept that waste type faces a fine of more than $7500, or up to $777,300 (5000 penalty units) if prosecuted. EPA can require the waste generator, transporter and receiver to clean up and pay for waste to be taken to a lawful place.”

Tips for managing Construction and Demolition waste

  • Know what types of waste will be generated during excavation, demolition and construction.
  • If a quote for managing waste is low, find out why. The company may be avoiding costs by taking the waste to a place that cannot lawfully be used as a waste facility.
  • While not a requirement, preparing and implementing a waste management plan ahead of demolition is an effective way of managing lawful waste disposal. A good plan would include:
    • details of each type of waste that will be generated, and the management action proposed for each type of waste
    • procedures that ensure the waste is dispose of at a lawful place
    • a description of the roles and responsibilities of everyone who manages the waste, including the site supervisor and subcontractors.

Remember:

  • The level of detail in the waste management plan should reflect the size and complexity of the project’s waste issues.
  • Regularly update the waste management plan to record how waste is managed and audit where waste is taken.
  • Provide adequate supervision to ensure waste management plans are implemented and complied with, and regularly audit everyone who manages waste on your behalf.
  • Provide training about the waste management plan and protecting the environment.
  • Keep accurate written records such as:
    • who transported the waste (company name, ABN, vehicle registration and driver details, date and time of transport, description of waste)
    • copies of waste receipts from the waste facility (date and time of delivery, name and address of the facility, its ABN, contact person)

Drainage and runoff

Melbourne has many beautiful waterways that are very sensitive to the effects of pollution.

During construction rainwater may flow into onsite or nearby drainage systems as well as nearby creeks and river systems. This can lead do contamination of the water from the worksite or clogging of drains or waterways from picked up sediment or litter. Appropriate measures such as bunding must be taken to mitigate against this. Potential contamination of groundwater must also be considered.

Wetlands require environmental protection during landscape construction.

Wetlands require environmental protection during landscape construction.

Environmental Protection Agency – Works Approvals

 

Works approvals are issued by EPA Victoria under the Environment Protection Act 1970 .They are required for industrial and waste management activities that have the potential for significant environmental impact.

A works approval permits plant and equipment to be installed, the operation of which will result in one or more of:

  • the discharge of waste to the environment
  • an increase in, or alteration to, an existing discharge
  • a change in the way waste is treated or stored.

 

CO2 emissions

To minimise CO2 emissions Red’s Landscaping and Civil has introduced the following strategies.

 

  • Car-pooling amongst employees.
  • Selecting vehicles that run on alternative fuels. Such as;
    • 30% Ethanol.
    • PHEV (where feasible.)
  • Keeping the vehicle in good condition and getting the longest possible life out of them.
  • Use local suppliers as close as possible to the worksite.

 

Clinker

The construction industry is one of the largest contributors of atmospheric carbon dioxide, with concrete alone responsible for up to 8% of all anthropogenic carbon emissions. Carbon dioxide is released as a by-product when limestone (calcium carbonate) is heated to produce cement.

To minimise CO2 from the use of concrete Red’s Landscaping and Design has the following strategies.

 

  • Very accurate calculation of required concrete.
    • A professional estimator is used to accurately estimate quantities.
    • Accurate surveying of the worksite to drawing.
    • Accurate control of formwork dimensions.
    • Thinking ahead with form work to create a use for leftover concrete.
    • Checking drawings for excessively large foundation sections etc.
    • Issuing Purchase order with the correct quantity and grade of concrete.
    • Working with concrete suppliers on low clinker mixes when they become available.

References

This policy references following legislation in the State of Victoria;

 

 

 

 

Additional Environmental Protection Regulations – Queensland Government

Environmental protection regulation 2019

 

 

 

 

© 2020 Reds Landscaping and Civil quality commercial landscaping Melbourne

 

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